Saturday, May 17, 2014

Frozen: A Review

The animated film “Frozen” is a hit with our younger grandchildren.  We have both the DVD of the movie and the CD of the sound track, so even the little guys—ages 3 and 5—know all the words to the songs. 

I recently saw this comment on Facebook:  “Have I seen Frozen?  No.  It is just a children's movie.”  I disagree.  Just as fairy tales are not just for children but address universal themes of life, “Frozen” is an interesting story that provides the platform to consider topics like guilt, responsibility, selfless love, and life choices.

The screenplay evolved as all good stories do, often taking on a life of its own as the characters and their motivations became clearer. In interviews about the movie, the creators--especially song writing team Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez--explain how the direction of the film changed as new and significant themes emerged.  They started in one direction and ended up somewhere else, certainly a characteristic of good story-telling.

As I have had the opportunity to hear the opening song “Frozen Heart” several times (I have stopped counting), I have come to understand that it foreshadows the key themes of the film—the beauty and danger of ice (the created order) as well as the tension between love and fear (the human condition).  Here are the words:

Men :
Born of cold and winter air
and mountain rain combining.
This icy force both foul and fair
has a frozen heart worth mining.

So cut through the heart, cold and clear.
Strike for love and strike for fear.
See the beauty, sharp and sheer
Split the ice apart
And break the frozen heart

Hup! Ho!
Watch your step!
Let it go!

Hup! Ho!
Watch your step!
Let it go!

Man 1:
Beautiful!

Man 2 :
Powerful!

Man 3:
Dangerous!

Man 1 :
Cold!

Ice has a magic,
can't be controlled.
Stronger than one, stronger than ten,
stronger than a hundred men! Ho!

Born of cold and winter air
and mountain rain combining.
This icy force both foul and fair
has a frozen heart worth mining.

Cut through the heart, cold and clear.
Strike for love and strike for fear.
There's beauty and there's danger here
Split the ice apart
Beware the frozen heart...

The “frozen heart” that resists the love of another is the danger that all of us experience at one time or another.  In his parables, Jesus often challenged his hearers to consider both where their hearts were (what they were devoted to) and who they would be willing to give their hearts to.  His teaching was intended to lead them to place their hearts in the hands of a God who only wanted the best for them.  When our hearts are frozen or hidden away, we cannot give them to God.  God’s message calls for the melting of the frozen heart so that it can be given to God.

Is “Frozen” a Christian film?  No, but the themes it evokes urge us to God-centered conversations with our children.  Take advantage of the opportunity.



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